Monarchs don’t much care for heavy metal!

Alessandro Dieni: Thursday, July 15, 2021

 

Heavy metals are found naturally in the Earth’s crust. However, human activity stirs up an important amount of these metals into the environment. Most organisms are now exposed to much higher concentrations than those encountered in their evolutionary history. But how does it affect the monarch? Does it risk being exposed to these heavy metals, and above all, is it sensitive to those pollutants?

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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How to create a monarch habitat

Alessandro Dieni: Friday, May 28, 2021

 

Are you currently working in your garden? If you want to help monarchs, it is essential to incorporate milkweed, as they cannot complete their life cycle without this plant. But do not forget to addp lants with flowers that are rich in nectar.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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Monarchs know how to take care of themselves

Alessandro Dieni: Tuesday, March 9, 2021

 

Monarchs are not immune to illnesses or parasites. In order to avoid overly high infection rates, females infected by a parasite lay their eggs on “antiparasitic” milkweed species, as though they were giving their young medicine.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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Time to get at your milkweed seeds!

Alessandro Dieni: Monday, December 28, 2020

 

The days are getting cooler. Now is the perfect time to get your hands on some milkweed seeds! Learn how to identify the ideal milkweed follicles for harvest, as well as how to manage and plant your seeds in the fall.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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Getting a better understanding of the monarch’s spring migration

Alessandro Dieni: Tuesday, September 1, 2020

 

A number of people have contacted us over the summer to ask how the monarch population is doing. Are we dealing with a smaller population of monarchs this year, or have the monarchs simply been delayed in getting to our latitudes? Discover the different factors and strategies that can influence the monarch’s northern migration.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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Monarchs and milkweed, a complex relationship

Alessandro Dieni: Tuesday, August 11, 2020

 

Even if milkweed has different strategies to keep most herbivores at bay, the monarch butterfly has managed to counter them to feed on it exclusively. Discover the very complex relationship between these two organisms.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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A summer searching for monarchs and milkweed

Alessandro Dieni: Monday, June 1, 2020

 

Marian MacNair is a young researcher who traveled no less than 6,000 km last summer to study the monarch butterfly. Discover the story of her busy days spent meticulously counting eggs and caterpillars, and where she meets passionate entomologists!.

by Alessandro Dieni, Mission Monarch coordinator

and Marian MacNair, journalist and science educator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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When monarchs roost

André-Philippe Drapeau Picard: Thursday, October 10, 2019

It’s autumn, and monarchs are gradually heading south. During their migration they make stops, sometimes in large numbers. Let’s take a look at the astonishing phenomenon of monarch roosting.

by André-Philippe Drapeau Picard, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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Make it count!

André-Philippe Drapeau Picard: Tuesday, August 27, 2019

In the information and mobile-technology age, it’s easier than ever to immortalize the spectacles that nature presents. Were you aware that when you share your observations of animal, plant and other species you could be contributing to advances in scientific knowledge?

by André-Philippe Drapeau Picard, Mission Monarch coordinator

 

To read this article, please visit the Space for Life website.

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